30 years after the incident, Britain apologizes for a mistake it made during the…

Terrace pointed out that it was an unacceptable default

The British government apologized today (Tuesday) in the case of British Airways passengers who were taken hostage by Saddam Hussein and used as human shields, admitting, after thirty years, that it did not warn the airline that Iraq invaded Kuwait, where the plane landed.

Flight BA149 took off from London to Kuala Lumpur and stopped in Kuwait, the capital, on August 2, 1990, hours after the Iraqi invasion of the country, which later led to the outbreak of the second Gulf War.

The passengers were collected for several days at a nearby hotel under the control of the Iraqi Chief of Staff, and then transported to Baghdad and used as human shields in strategic locations.

Several of the 367 passengers and crew members spent more than four months in captivity, and were placed in positions that were potential targets for the Western Alliance.

For three decades, former hostages have been striving to find out some information that specifically belongs to the British government, asking it to take responsibility.

And British Foreign Secretary Liz Terrace admitted today before Parliament that the British ambassador to Kuwait informed London of an Iraqi invasion around midnight on August 2, 1990, that is, after the plane took off. However, the government did not send any warning message to British Airways, which could have diverted the plane.

Trass indicated that the ambassador’s appeal was never disclosed or publicly acknowledged until today, neither before Parliament nor public opinion, according to “France 24”.

She pointed out that this behavior is an unacceptable negligence.

“As a current minister, I offer my apologies in Parliament and express my deepest sympathy to the people who have been detained and mistreated,” Terrace said.

On the other hand, Barry Manners, 55, who is one of the former hostages, rejected the government’s apologies, which he accuses of also lying about British intelligence agents.

On the other hand, the airline, which has been accused of negligence and cover-up, welcomed these documents confirming that British Airways was not informed of the invasion.

30 years after the incident, Britain apologizes for a mistake it made during Iraq’s invasion of Kuwait


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The British government apologized today (Tuesday) in the case of British Airways passengers taken hostage by Saddam Hussein and used as human shields, admitting after thirty years that it did not warn the airline that Iraq invaded Kuwait, where the plane landed.

Flight BA149 took off from London to Kuala Lumpur and stopped in Kuwait, the capital, on August 2, 1990, hours after the Iraqi invasion of the country, which later led to the outbreak of the second Gulf War.

The passengers were collected for several days at a nearby hotel under the control of the Iraqi Chief of Staff, and then transported to Baghdad and used as human shields in strategic locations.

Several of the 367 passengers and crew members spent more than four months in captivity, and were placed in positions that were potential targets for the Western Alliance.

For three decades, former hostages have been striving to find out some information that specifically belongs to the British government, asking it to take responsibility.

And British Foreign Secretary Liz Terrace admitted today before Parliament that the British ambassador to Kuwait informed London of an Iraqi invasion around midnight on August 2, 1990, that is, after the plane took off. However, the government did not send any warning message to British Airways, which could have diverted the plane.

Trass indicated that the ambassador’s appeal was never disclosed or publicly acknowledged until today, neither before Parliament nor public opinion, according to “France 24”.

She pointed out that this behavior is an unacceptable negligence.

“As a current minister, I offer my apologies in Parliament and express my deepest sympathy to the people who have been detained and mistreated,” Terrace said.

On the other hand, Barry Manners, 55, who is one of the former hostages, rejected the government’s apologies, which he accuses of also lying about British intelligence agents.

On the other hand, the airline, which has been accused of negligence and cover-up, welcomed these documents confirming that British Airways was not informed of the invasion.

November 23, 2021 – 18 Rabi’ al-Akhir 1443

09:09 PM


Terrace pointed out that it was an unacceptable default

The British government apologized today (Tuesday) in the case of British Airways passengers taken hostage by Saddam Hussein and used as human shields, admitting after thirty years that it did not warn the airline that Iraq invaded Kuwait, where the plane landed.

Flight BA149 took off from London to Kuala Lumpur and stopped in Kuwait, the capital, on August 2, 1990, hours after the Iraqi invasion of the country, which later led to the outbreak of the second Gulf War.

The passengers were collected for several days at a nearby hotel under the control of the Iraqi Chief of Staff, and then transported to Baghdad and used as human shields in strategic locations.

Several of the 367 passengers and crew members spent more than four months in captivity, and were placed in positions that were potential targets for the Western Alliance.

For three decades, former hostages have been striving to find out some information that specifically belongs to the British government, asking it to take responsibility.

And British Foreign Secretary Liz Terrace admitted today before Parliament that the British ambassador to Kuwait informed London of an Iraqi invasion around midnight on August 2, 1990, that is, after the plane took off. However, the government did not send any warning message to British Airways, which could have diverted the plane.

Trass indicated that the ambassador’s appeal was never disclosed or publicly acknowledged until today, neither before Parliament nor public opinion, according to “France 24”.

She pointed out that this behavior is an unacceptable negligence.

“As a current minister, I offer my apologies in Parliament and express my deepest sympathy to the people who have been detained and mistreated,” Terrace said.

On the other hand, Barry Manners, 55, who is one of the former hostages, rejected the government’s apologies, which he accuses of also lying about British intelligence agents.

On the other hand, the airline, which has been accused of negligence and cover-up, welcomed these documents confirming that British Airways was not informed of the invasion.

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