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A promising Christmas tree season in New Brunswick

The 2021 season promises to be very good for New Brunswick fir producers, while the number of trees produced in the other provinces is declining.



Laurie Alain accompanies clients on her plantation.


© / Radio-Canada
Laurie Alain accompanies clients on her plantation.

The month of December has not yet started when Laurie Allain, owner of the Santa Claus Garden, has already sold almost half of her trees ready to be cut this year.

Probably 150, with the trees that are selected in advance», He believes.



Natural Christmas trees are in high demand in 2021.


© / Radio-Canada
Natural Christmas trees are in high demand in 2021.

Some of the fir trees on his land in Sainte-Marie-de-Kent are reserved from October.

The natural fir has resumed in popularity since last year.

A difficult season elsewhere in the country

In Quebec and British Columbia, there is talk of a virtual shortage of natural Christmas trees, with the dry weather that has not helped their growth.



New Brunswick-grown Christmas trees are sold in international markets.


© / Radio-Canada
New Brunswick-grown Christmas trees are sold in international markets.

This is a situation that should not be happening in New Brunswick.

The problem there – then I think that’s what happened in Quebec and everywhere too – is late frosts in spring.», Explains Laurie Allain. The new growth of the tree, if it freezes in June, you lose it.»

Rising demand

New Brunswick exports nearly 375,000 trees to the United States and around the world each year.

Sophie-Michèle Cyr, owner of the plantation Grand River, in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, has seen the number of requests increase this year, due to the shortage in the other provinces.



Sophie-Michèle Cyr is the owner of the Grand River plantation in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, New Brunswick.


© / Radio-Canada
Sophie-Michèle Cyr is the owner of the Grand River plantation in Notre-Dame-de-Lourdes, New Brunswick.

Demand increases, then the number of trees decreases. Or it is less there to meet demand, for various reasons, not just because of the droughts this year. It’s a trend that started a long time ago», Indicates Sophie-Michèle Cyr.

The peak of the season

The next two weeks are shaping up to be very busy for Laurie Allain, as several families go looking for their trees.

Lots of families with small childrenWill present themselves, in his opinion.

I have people too, grandparents who come with [leurs] grandchildren. Then that’s what is beautiful, what makes the beauty of the Garden of Santa Claus: it’s the little children», Confides Mr. Allain.

From the report by Félix Arseneault

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