Advance knowledge of the relationship between epigenetics and aging processes, key to personalized medicine

In the `Biological Area´ section of the 62nd SEGG Congress, the symposium “Epigenetics and aging” was held, moderated by Dr. Dámaso Crespo Santiago, professor of Cell Biology. University of cantabria. Its content revolved around stress, aging and epigenetics in rare forms of disease; methionine, …


Notice: Undefined variable: cat_keep_reading in /var/www/immedicohospitalario/public_html/zonas_publicidad/IMMEntreTexto.php on line 8

Notice: Undefined variable: cat_keep_reading in /var/www/immedicohospitalario/public_html/zonas_publicidad/IMMEntreTexto.php on line 14

In the `Biological Area´ section of the 62nd Congress of the SEGG, the symposium “Epigenetics and aging” was held, moderated by the Dr. Damaso Crespo Santiago, Professor of Cell Biology. University of cantabria. Its content revolved around stress, aging and epigenetics in rare forms of disease; methionine, epigenetics and aging; and epigenetic changes in aging hematopoietic stem cells.

The prof. Charles Rome, biochemist and researcher at the University of Valencia, focused on the theme of stress, aging and epigenetics in rare forms of disease that as stated, “They can serve as a model for the study of many physiological and pathological processes, including ageing, a very complex process with many vertices”.

In many diseases, as he explained, a deregulation of oxidative stress is observed, as a consequence of the work of the mitochondria cells. This stress influences many factors such as the stability and length of telomeres, mitochondrial function, DNA damage, which if not repaired can, in turn, produce new oxidative stress. It can even cause cell death, which is the basis of many pathological processes and is physiologically part of aging. “ANDOxidative stress, along with inflammation, are two of the vertices of aging“, he indicated.

The epigeneticsas he explained, is a part of genetics that is regulated in a particular way, it is the key to cell differentiation, having shown that “genes are not everything“. “Epigenetics produces changes that can last over time and in the very long term, but something that is important is that they can also be reversible”. It is a key concept for precision medicine, this expert stressed. “From this it has been shown that it is possible to modulateto gene activity, change the life of cells, and even attack the disease as something specific and unique to each person. It is a key concept for precision medicine“, he added.

As explained by prof. Rome, at another point in his intervention, “many factors of daily life can produce a deregulation of the epigenetic machinery and, in turn, oxidative stress and the enzymes that regulate these mechanisms can be altered and lead to greater cell damage, giving rise to diseases that are usually associated with age , among others, metabolic deregulations, diabetes, cognitive impairment, loss of muscle mass, among others”. Hence “knowledge of the progression of cell damage can help predict diseases or implement strategies that take these predictions into account“.

Diet and epigenetic machinery Another of the speakers, the researcher Mariona Jové Font, from the University of Lleida delved into “methionine, epigenetics and aging”. Methionine is an essential amino acid that is incorporated into the body through the diet and plays an important role in the formation of proteins and peptides. “The aging process causes specific changes in methionine metabolism and epigenetics“, he claimed.

As he noted, “the regulation of longevity depends more on the flow of the cycle than on methionine levels. It is advisable to analyze all the metabolites of the methionine cycle in order to better understand how these processes are triggered“.

He also highlighted the importance of all those nutritional interventionsthat are capable of modifying the levels of methionine, since they will allow the modulation of the methylation processes of DNA, histones or proteins or of other metabolites and influence the epigenetic imprint of the cells”.

He explained that there is adifferent regulation both in centenarians and in long-lived species and that this suggests changes in epigenetic processes with which the changes observed during aging could be partially understood”.

In addition, he considered it important to highlight that “dietary interventions can modify the ‘epigenetic clock’, although he recognized the need for more studies on methionine restriction in order to complete the puzzle on the consequences of dietary restrictions“.

Finally, the researcher Maria Carolina Florian, of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), gave a presentation on the major epigenetic changes in aging hematopoietic stem cells, located in peripheral blood and bone marrow, based on how this process triggers a deterioration in the potential of these cells.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.