Carlos Ghosn joins the ranks of the powerful White Collar Fugitives

(Bloomberg) – Carlos Ghosn’s breathtaking escape from Japan makes him one of the most famous economic refugees of recent years who joins Malaysian businessman Jho Low and Indian tycoon Vijay Mallya.

Former chiefs of Nissan Motor Co. and Renault SA, who were brought to justice for financial crimes in Japan, defended this move by declaring in a statement that “they can no longer be taken hostage by a manipulated Japanese judicial system.” ,

It is unclear how Ghosn escaped as he has been under house arrest and close surveillance since his arrest in November 2018 in April. He is a Lebanese citizen who has no extradition agreement with Japan and is held up there. He also has Brazilian and French citizenship. Ghosn’s lawyer Junichiro Hironaka said his lawyer team had all of his passports, adding that it was likely that he had entered Lebanon under a different name.

Here you can see some well-known refugees from the business world in recent years.

Jho Low

Malaysia is still trying to attract Low Taek Jho, known as Jho Low, the suspected thought leader behind the withdrawal of billions of dollars from the 1MDB state investment fund. The scandal resulted in Prime Minister Najib Razak losing an election in 2018 and ending 61 years of his party rule. He has involved individuals and companies, including Goldman Sachs Group Inc., far and wide.

The Malaysian authorities complained last week about the lack of cooperation from other countries to find Jho Low. In September, Inspector General Abdul Hamid Bador said the financier was in a jurisdiction that has an extradition agreement with Malaysia and talks were underway with a party suspected of protecting him.

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Christopher Skase

The entrepreneur died in Mallorca in 2001, a decade after fleeing Australia when his media and hotel empire, Qintex Australia Ltd. collapsed. The companies included Seven Network Australia Ltd., the second largest television broadcaster in the country.

Skase successfully fought offers to extradite him to Australia. The Spanish government canceled the expulsion order a month before he died of cancer at the age of 52.

Jerome Kerviel

Kerviel was sentenced to a short prison sentence in one of the largest cases of rogue trafficking in history, but not before he went to Italy and met Pope Francis in the Vatican. He then went on a three-month walk back to France, where he was detained at the border.

He served only 114 days in prison and cost his former employer Societe Generale SA $ 6.3 billion.

Vijay Mallya

The so-called king of the good times has been subjected to extradition efforts by the Indian authorities for years. Mallya is based in London, where he was brought to justice this month by a dozen Indian state-owned banks that requested that he be declared bankrupt over £ 1.15 billion ($ 1.5 billion) in unpaid debt.

Mallya’s business interests ranged from alcohol to auto racing to airlines. He was the founder of the now dissolved Kingfisher Airlines Ltd.

Nirav modes

The famous jeweler was arrested in London in March for allegedly cheating the Punjab National Bank for $ 2 billion. He was refused bail because of “significant risks” that he would flee the country to avoid extradition to India.

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– With the support of Enda Curran, Paul Geitner and Sam Nagarajan.

Contact the reporter about this story: Will Davies in Hong Kong at wdavies13@bloomberg.net

Contact the editors responsible for this story: Young-Sam Cho at ycho2@bloomberg.net, Will Davies

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© 2019 Bloomberg L.P.

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