Deadly atmosphere in the Gulf due to climate change

What is the temperature of a wet lamp? .. And what is its danger to humans?

The Gulf region and other parts of the world face risks of “lethal” temperatures and humidity that scientists expect will hamper the human body’s ability to deal with it.

The “Washington Post” newspaper highlighted the extent to which the human body can adapt to future climate change and whether certain areas will become uninhabitable.

wet bulb temperature

She referred to a scientific study conducted by a team of researchers, last year, who measured these risks by determining a rate called the wet bulb temperature (WBT), a measure that scientists use to know the areas in which it may become dangerous for humans to live.

This scale not only reflects the temperatures in the atmosphere, but also the amount of water in the air. An increase in the number means that the sweat that the human body emits is difficult to evaporate to deal with the high heat.

The body has the flexibility to deal with high heat through sweating, but the increased humidity in the atmosphere hinders its ability to cool itself, which is what happens due to climate change.

The temperature that the human body can withstand

The upper limit in wet-bulb temperature that the human body can tolerate is 95°F (35°C), but any temperature above 86°F (30°C) can be “dangerous and deadly”.

The study notes that “the overall rate of moist heat has doubled since 1979.”

dangerous areas

The scientists noted that the temperatures indicated in the scale are occurring at an “increasing pace” in parts of the world, namely Mexico, Central America, the Gulf region, India, Pakistan and Southeast Asia, all of which will move towards this dangerous threshold before the end of the century, and the study indicates that regions such as South Asia And the Middle East could regularly surpass it by 2075.

The sea breeze can be deadly

Some may think that getting close to the beach is a good way to enjoy the breeze and relax, but Radley Horton, a professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Observatory, who was involved in the study, told the newspaper that getting close to the water in extreme conditions could make matters worse, given that higher temperatures Heat causes the water to evaporate, which adds moisture to the air.

“If you’re sitting in a city along the bay, the sea breeze can be deadly,” he said.

Gulf temperature

Horton and colleagues found that parts of the UAE and Pakistan have each crossed the 95-degree mark for an hour or two more than three times since 1987.

During the summer, parts of the Gulf can reach temperatures of 86 to 87.8 degrees Fahrenheit (30 to 31 degrees Celsius), causing the water to evaporate more quickly, according to the report.

Theresa Cavazos, an oceanographer, said scientists also detected a “very significant” increase in humidity and heat in the California Gulf Coast and in the Mexican state of Sonora.

health risks

This rise in heat and humidity may lead to the “failure” of the body’s systems. The body is making every effort to deal with the situation, which leads to increased pressure on the heart and kidneys, and the body’s organs are more susceptible to damage, especially in the presence of pre-existing conditions.

Climate change has recently caused heavy rains, which led to devastating floods in several regions of western Europe, especially in western Germany, which resulted in dozens of victims. Meanwhile, parts of Scandinavia, the coldest region in northern Europe, are experiencing soaring temperatures.

Fires in the western United States and Canada have killed dozens of people due to rising temperatures, and bushfires have devastated homes in several villages.

Twelve people were killed after torrential rain swept through a subway in the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou, while dams and rivers overflowed due to heavy rains across China’s Henan Province.

Severe warning .. Study: “Deadly” atmosphere in the Gulf due to climate change


already

The Gulf region and other parts of the world face risks of “lethal” temperatures and humidity that scientists expect will hamper the human body’s ability to deal with it.

The “Washington Post” newspaper highlighted the extent to which the human body can adapt to future climate change and whether certain areas will become uninhabitable.

wet bulb temperature

She referred to a scientific study conducted by a team of researchers, last year, who measured these risks by determining a rate called the wet bulb temperature (WBT), a measure that scientists use to know the areas in which it may become dangerous for humans to live.

This scale not only reflects the temperatures in the atmosphere, but also the amount of water in the air. An increase in the number means that the sweat that the human body emits is difficult to evaporate to deal with the high heat.

The body has the flexibility that makes it deal with high heat through sweating, but the increased humidity in the atmosphere hinders its ability to cool itself, which is what happens due to climate change.

The temperature that the human body can withstand

The upper limit in wet-bulb temperature that the human body can tolerate is 95°F (35°C), but any temperature above 86°F (30°C) can be “dangerous and deadly”.

The study notes that “the overall rate of moist heat has doubled since 1979.”

dangerous areas

The scientists noted that the temperatures indicated in the scale are occurring at an “increasing pace” in parts of the world, namely Mexico, Central America, the Gulf region, India, Pakistan and Southeast Asia, all of which will move towards this dangerous threshold before the end of the century, and the study indicates that regions such as South Asia And the Middle East could regularly surpass it by 2075.

The sea breeze can be deadly

Some may think that getting close to the beach is a good way to enjoy the breeze and relax, but Radley Horton, a professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Observatory, who was involved in the study, told the newspaper that getting close to the water in extreme conditions could make matters worse, given that higher temperatures Heat causes the water to evaporate, which adds moisture to the air.

“If you’re sitting in a city along the bay, the sea breeze can be deadly,” he said.

Gulf temperature

Horton and colleagues found that parts of the UAE and Pakistan have each crossed the 95-degree mark for an hour or two more than three times since 1987.

During the summer, parts of the Gulf can reach temperatures of 86 to 87.8 degrees Fahrenheit (30 to 31 degrees Celsius), causing the water to evaporate more quickly, according to the report.

Theresa Cavazos, an oceanographer, said scientists also detected a “very significant” increase in humidity and heat in the California Gulf Coast and in the Mexican state of Sonora.

health risks

This rise in heat and humidity may lead to the “failure” of the body’s systems. The body is making every effort to deal with the situation, which leads to increased pressure on the heart and kidneys, and the body’s organs are more susceptible to damage, especially in the presence of pre-existing conditions.

Climate change has recently caused heavy rains, which led to devastating floods in several regions of western Europe, especially in western Germany, which resulted in dozens of victims. Meanwhile, parts of Scandinavia, the coldest region in northern Europe, are experiencing soaring temperatures.

Fires in the western United States and Canada have killed dozens of people due to rising temperatures, and bushfires have devastated homes in several villages.

Twelve people were killed after torrential rain swept through a subway in the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou, while dams and rivers overflowed due to heavy rains across China’s Henan Province.

July 29, 2021 – Dhu al-Hijjah 19 1442

05:19 PM


What is the temperature of a wet lamp? .. And what is its danger to humans?

The Gulf region and other parts of the world face risks of “lethal” temperatures and humidity that scientists expect will hamper the human body’s ability to deal with it.

The “Washington Post” newspaper highlighted the extent to which the human body can adapt to future climate change and whether certain areas will become uninhabitable.

wet bulb temperature

She referred to a scientific study conducted by a team of researchers, last year, who measured these risks by determining a rate called the wet bulb temperature (WBT), a measure that scientists use to know the areas in which it may become dangerous for humans to live.

This scale not only reflects the temperatures in the atmosphere, but also the amount of water in the air. An increase in the number means that the sweat that the human body emits is difficult to evaporate to deal with the high heat.

The body has the flexibility to deal with high heat through sweating, but the increased humidity in the atmosphere hinders its ability to cool itself, which is what happens due to climate change.

The temperature that the human body can withstand

The upper limit in wet-bulb temperature that the human body can tolerate is 95°F (35°C), but any temperature above 86°F (30°C) can be “dangerous and deadly”.

The study notes that “the overall rate of moist heat has doubled since 1979.”

dangerous areas

The scientists noted that the temperatures indicated in the scale are occurring at an “increasing pace” in parts of the world, namely Mexico, Central America, the Gulf region, India, Pakistan and Southeast Asia, all of which will move towards this dangerous threshold before the end of the century, and the study indicates that regions such as South Asia And the Middle East could regularly surpass it by 2075.

The sea breeze can be deadly

Some may think that getting close to the beach is a good way to enjoy the breeze and relax, but Radley Horton, a professor at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Observatory, who was involved in the study, told the newspaper that getting close to the water in extreme conditions could make matters worse, given that higher temperatures Heat causes the water to evaporate, which adds moisture to the air.

“If you’re sitting in a city along the bay, the sea breeze can be deadly,” he said.

Gulf temperature

Horton and colleagues found that parts of the UAE and Pakistan have each crossed the 95-degree mark for an hour or two more than three times since 1987.

During the summer, parts of the Gulf can reach temperatures of 86 to 87.8 degrees Fahrenheit (30 to 31 degrees Celsius), causing the water to evaporate more quickly, according to the report.

Theresa Cavazos, an oceanographer, said scientists also detected a “very significant” increase in humidity and heat in the California Gulf Coast and in the Mexican state of Sonora.

health risks

This rise in heat and humidity may lead to the “failure” of the body’s systems. The body is making every effort to deal with the situation, which leads to increased pressure on the heart and kidneys, and the body’s organs are more susceptible to damage, especially in the presence of pre-existing conditions.

Climate change has recently caused heavy rains, which led to devastating floods in several regions of western Europe, especially in western Germany, which resulted in dozens of victims. Meanwhile, parts of Scandinavia, the coldest region in northern Europe, are experiencing soaring temperatures.

Fires in the western United States and Canada have killed dozens of people due to rising temperatures, and bushfires have devastated homes in several villages.

Twelve people were killed after torrential rain swept through a subway in the central Chinese city of Zhengzhou, while dams and rivers overflowed due to heavy rains across China’s Henan Province.

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