Demonstrations in Beirut: the anger of the Lebanese in ten images

After the tragedy, they demand an account from a conspired political class. On Saturday afternoon, thousands of Lebanese gathered in Martyrs Square in Beirut, a few days after the terrible explosion in the city’s port, which has left at least 158 ​​dead and more than 6 so far. 000 injured.

At least 120 injured people are in critical condition, according to the Lebanese health ministry. 300,000 people found themselves homeless overnight. Still according to the ministry, 21 people are still missing, while hopes of finding survivors are dwindling.

1. “Vengeance, revenge, until the fall of the regime”. Anger roars in the streets of Beirut. In the crowd, some demonstrators brandish gallows, or the names of those killed in the explosion.

Thai Al-Sudani / REUTERS

2. In front of the demonstrators, police en masse. To control the overflows, soldiers and police were deployed in the streets of Beirut.

Anwar Amro / AFP
Anwar Amro / AFP

3. Gas fire on the sidelines of the peaceful assembly. Police used tear gas against groups of young protesters who threw stones and sticks.

Hannah McKay/REUTERS
Hannah McKay/REUTERS

4. Tensions are mounting. On the sidelines of the rally, a protester ransacked a window in the streets of Beirut.

STR / AFP
STR / AFP

5. “The Day of Judgment”. This is the name given to the mobilization of the day. On social networks, a hashtag, #PendezLes, circulates and expresses the anger of the Lebanese who believe that the authorities are responsible for the explosion on Tuesday.

Anwar Amro / AFP
Anwar Amro / AFP

6. Cobbles against the police, and the government. Groups of young demonstrators strongly attacked the police in the district of the Chamber of Deputies.

Hannah McKay/REUTERS
Hannah McKay/REUTERS

7. Blocked. In particular, the security forces are trying to prevent certain groups from advancing towards Parliament.

STR / AFP
STR / AFP

8. They stand up “against the system”. “We must stand up against the whole system […] the change must be commensurate with the scale of the disaster, ”explains Fares al-Hablabi, a 28-year-old activist who took to the streets.

Anwar Amro / AFP
Anwar Amro / AFP

9. Face to face. A protester, flag of Lebanon in hand, approached the police officers who are on guard near the Lebanese Parliament.

STR / AFP
STR / AFP

10. Walls on fire. A protester even set fire to walls erected to protect Parliament, a sign of protest by the government. “After three days spent clearing the rubble and healing our wounds, it is time to let our anger explode and to punish them for having killed people”, comments Fares al-Hablabi.

STR / AFP
STR / AFP

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