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Gangs, covid and migration, the challenges of Xiomara

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The leftist candidate is advancing to become the nation's first female president.  Photo: AFP


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The leftist candidate is advancing to become the nation’s first female president. Photo: AFP

Xiomara Castro, virtual president of Honduras, must assume a country hit by gang violence, drug trafficking and two fierce hurricanes that in 2020 devastated this nation where 59% of its 10 million inhabitants are poor.

Unemployment went from 5.7% in 2019 to 10.9% in 2020, largely due to the coronavirus pandemic. Which pushes thousands of its citizens to try to migrate irregularly to the United States in search of work.

Our commitment is to guarantee young people that here in their homeland they will find what they need to generate opportunities and well-being for their family. It is a guarantee and a promise that we have made, “said Castro after the publication of the results that gave him the advantage.

According to the latest counts by the National Electoral Council (CNE), Castro has 53.6% of the votes.

With that, he surpasses the official Nasry Asfura, who has 33.8% of the preferences, after being the candidate of the party of President Juan Orlando Hernández.

At 62, she is advancing to become the first president of Honduras, which would end more than 100 years of bipartisanship between the conservative National Party (PNH) and the centrist Liberal Party (PLH), which have ruled since the late 19th century.

Thank you people! We turned 12 years of tears and pain into joy. The sacrifice of our martyrs was not in vain. We will begin an era of prosperity, of solidarity, through dialogue with all sectors, without discrimination and without sectarianism, “Castro wrote after learning the first results.

Wielding a leftist speech that vindicates several of Zelaya’s proposals, deposed when preparing for a popular consultation on a constitutional reform, Castro assures that, once in power in January, it will be she who will take the reins and not the man with the one who married at age 19.

“She is a woman with character who will make decisions in government,” said Anarela Velez, historian and friend of the candidate.



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