Government of Mexico, pharmaceutical companies and the UN seek to resolve the lack of medicines

The Institute of Health for Wellbeing (Insabi) of the Government of Mexico, the United Nations Office for Project Services (Unops) and the pharmaceutical industry strengthened their commitment to solve the drug shortage in Mexico on Tuesday.

In a statement, the three bodies expressed their common commitment to implement specific actions “that allow the supply of medicines and healing materials to continue in a favorable manner to serve the Mexican population.”

They recalled that since the consolidated purchase process of medicines for the period 2021-2024 began, in July 2020, work tables have been held to address issues related to the progress of purchases.

In addition to the fact that since the beginning of this year, progress has been presented on the deliveries corresponding to the purchase for 2021, in addition to the results of the work tables and the key points that will be strengthened in the purchase bases for 2022.

Likewise, they highlighted the importance of the work tables “in order to align operational aspects and continue to facilitate supply.”

They detailed that the work tables are mainly focused on the logistics of deliveries, contract management and quality assurance.

Finally, they affirmed that the representatives of the pharmaceutical industry have recognized that these spaces for dialogue are “fundamental” to continue contributing jointly so that millions of Mexican men and women have their medicines in a timely manner.

This morning, during the morning press conference from the National Palace, the Mexican Secretary of Health, Jorge Alcocer Varela, indicated that, as of this Monday, more than 400 million pieces of medicines have been purchased this year.

He pointed out that purchases are made according to the demand and the opinion of the experts, and “not according to what the pharmaceutical companies want to sell.”

The crisis due to the shortage of medicines in the health sector worsened in 2019 due to budget cuts and changes in the way of buying medicines imposed by the Government of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who assumed the Presidency on December 1, 2018 .

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