Homicide – A Year on the Streets of Baltimore 5. July 22

B
altimore, Friday, July 22, 1988. An old, harmless-looking woman is searched. Inspector Donald Waltemeyer knows you should never be fooled by appearances. Indicted for three murders and as many assassination attempts, Geraldine Parrish has something to feel bad about, indeed. She has come across a tough guy who won’t let go until he has proven his heinous trick.

It is already summer and spirits are far from being calmed. With the Latoniya file as a backdrop since the first volume, Philippe Squarzoni continues to associate the description of other investigations due to the brigade. The great strength ofHomicide holds in using a cool, factual tone to illuminate eminently realistic situations. It gives chills and shocks all the more. In this episode, the screenwriter demonstrates and insists in particular on the gulf separating fiction (television and novels) and sordid banality, much less glamorous and bombastic, especially with scenes set in a court. The reader is drawn to this daily life which constitutes the lot of the investigators presented. Far from chases, rains of bullets, screeching tires and cult phrases, these fallible beings absolutely do not deserve less by their tenacity, their meticulousness, and above all, their faith in this justice weighed down by the administrative straitjacket. and soiled by human baseness. At the end of this fifth opus, empathy for these shadow heroes who rub shoulders with the worst side of humanity grows. The narration here is almost poetic by evoking a little more their inner feelings, as if the powerlessness of the system and the darkness of life inspired a kind of swan song announcing the imminent end of the confession of these men of law with the profession in its blood and which, despite the mountain of obstacles, do not lose faith in their profession.

The sober layout, associated with the monochrome gray colorization, generates this leaden cover that weighs on everyone’s shoulders. This particular atmosphere is perfect for the subject, all in tension.

Read the review of volume 1Read the review of volume 3.

Impactful, A year on the streets of Baltimore turns out to be an excellent series relating with an extremely accurate text the ordinary of the cops of one of the most difficult cities in the United States.

By L. Moeneclaey

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