New demonstrations called in Myanmar in defiance of martial law

Protesters hold up images of Aung San Suu Kyi, the arrested Burmese state councilor, during a protest against the military coup in Yangon, Burma. Thousands of people took to the streets on the third day of massive protests against the military coup. EFE / EPA / LYNN BO BO

The civil disobedience movement in Myanmar against the military junta that took power called for new demonstrations for this Tuesday despite the martial law decreed last night by the military to prevent protests.

From early in the morning, the police established checkpoints on several bridges and roads that lead to the center of Rangoon, the former capital and the most populated city, the scene since Saturday of mass demonstrations in rejection of the military government, led by General Min Aung Hlaing.

Hundreds of people gathered on one side of the bridge in an industrial area of ​​the city due to the impossibility of being able to cross due to the strong police deployment, which kept the traffic under control.

Myanmar’s military junta on Monday imposed martial law in several cities and districts in Rangoon in response to the demonstrations, banning gatherings of more than five people and imposing a night curfew, among other measures.

The announcement came after the military, through the state television channel MRTV, threaten to take action against the protesters and accuse them of damaging the country’s stability, security and the rule of law.

The internet connection in Burma returned to practically its usual levels on Monday after the cutoff of more than 24 hours during the weekend ordered by the military government that took power just a week ago.  EFE / EPA / MAUNG LONLAN

The internet connection in Burma returned to practically its usual levels on Monday after the cutoff of more than 24 hours during the weekend ordered by the military government that took power just a week ago. EFE / EPA / MAUNG LONLAN

In his first speech to the nation, Min Aung Hlaing asked citizens last night to remain “united as a country” and to pay attention “to the facts and not to the emotions”, by justifying the military coup d’état due to an alleged electoral fraud in the elections last November.

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of the country since Saturday to protest against the seizure of power by the Army, which already ruled Myanmar with an iron fist between 1962 and 2011, and demand the release of the arrested democratic leaders, including Nobel Peace Prize Aung San Suu Kyi.

Since the riot, at least 170 people have been arrested, the vast majority politicians and members of the party led by Suu Kyi, the National League for Democracy (NLD), including 18 people who have already been released.

La LND, in government since 2016, swept the November elections by winning 83% of the seats in contentionBut the military alleges that these results were rigged and thus justify their coup.

With information from EFE

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