Professional football: monitoring of financial flows planned


Fight against money laundering: professional football should be better monitored.
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The financial flows in professional football should be monitored. This advance offers opportunities and avoids risks that are already threatening German and European football in their business model.

Dhe conference of justice ministers of the federal states intends to extend the legal regulations for combating money laundering, in particular the reporting obligations already in force in other areas of life, to “professional football”. The Justice Department of the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen, which currently chairs the Conference of Justice Ministers, has drawn up a corresponding paper. Detached from individual measures, the fundamental question arises whether the proposal to monitor financial flows in commercial football more closely is a curse or a blessing for the clubs.

The advance from Bremen is likely to meet with skepticism and rejection in most clubs and the DFL. A foreseeable argument for the rejection could be that monitoring and reporting obligations mean additional work and thus endanger the competitiveness of the clubs. The idea of ​​monitoring the financial flows down to individual cash payments in professional football, however, offers opportunities and avoids risks that are already threatening German and European football in their business model. In order to understand these risks, it is necessary to take a global look at the markets and market potentials as well as the competitors involved.

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