Supreme Court agrees to review “public charge” immigration rule



Supreme Court building.  Migration Policy Institute (MPI) estimates that no more than 167,000 people may not be eligible for a green card.  (ASSOCIATED PRESS)


© Provided by The LA Times
Supreme Court building. Migration Policy Institute (MPI) estimates that no more than 167,000 people may not be eligible for a green card. (ASSOCIATED PRESS)

The US Supreme Court agreed to examine the legality of former President Donald Trump’s “public charge” rule, which prohibits immigrants who obtain government benefits from granting them residency.

President-elect Joe Biden, who has criticized Trump’s immigration approach, is expected to overturn the rule.

The now-standing rule, issued in October 2020 by the Department of Homeland Security, states that immigrants applying for a “green card” will be adversely affected if they receive a much broader range of public benefits for more than a total of 12 months in any 36-month period, including the Medicaid health care program, housing, and food assistance such as SNAP.

Migration Policy Institute (MPI) estimates that no more than 167,000 people and possibly fewer (less than 1 percent of the 22.1 million non-citizens residing in the United States) may not be eligible for a green card.

The justices agreed to take an appeal the Trump administration had filed from a lower court ruling that found the rule likely violated federal immigration and administrative law by impermissibly expanding the definition of who counts as a “public charge” and greatly increasing the number of people who would be rejected for residency.

This article was first published in Los Angeles Times in Spanish.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.