The UK is slowly opening up – NRK Urix – Foreign news and documentaries

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The British live with some of the world’s strictest coronary restrictions, according to an overview from Oxford University.

  • Children and young people are not allowed to go to school.
  • Adults are not allowed to go to the pub.
  • No one is allowed to meet outside, except for training.
  • No one is allowed to go to a football match.

These are the strictest measures in the western world, according to the newspaper FT.

But now British Prime Minister Boris Johnson promises a gradual opening. Today he announced a four-stage reopening of British society.

PLAY: Two children play outside Manchester in December. The schools will now reopen on March 8.

Photo: Martin Rickett / AP

CLOSED: A boy walks home from a closed school in Westminister on March 18 last year.

CLOSED: A boy walks home from a closed school in Westminster on March 18 last year. The schools for the youngest were mostly open in 2020, but have been closed since 4 January this year.

Photo: Hannah Mckay / Reuters

– Lost social skills

  • From March 8, pupils and students will be able to go to school again. Children 11 years and older must wear a face mask.
  • People can meet outside again, in pairs, without training.
  • Patients in nursing homes can have one regular visitor.

Otherwise, everyone should follow the order to stay at home as much as possible.

The proposal from Prime Minister Boris Johnson is met with both relief and fear.

Nick Foster (45) in east London is happy about the changes, but at the same time worried about increased infection when the schools will reopen on March 8.

– Many of my friends are teachers and they are worried. But that students should wear face masks and be tested sounds reasonable. I think this is good news, says Foster to NRK.

CAUTION OPTIMIST: Nick Foster (45) from London has hardly seen people since the New Year.  Now he hopes the cautious reopening will work.

CAUTION OPTIMIST: Nick Foster (45) from London has hardly seen people since the New Year. Now he hopes the cautious reopening will work.

Photo: Private

He himself works as a composer and lives with a cohabitant and a cat. He feels lucky, even though he is afraid he has lost social skills in recent weeks. Since early January, he has hardly seen any people other than his cohabitant.

– The other day a friend came by and I talked to him on the doorstep. And it was as if I had forgotten how social one is, it was very strange, says Foster.

He himself is anxious and notices that the third shutdown has been tough.

– It has been more difficult now. I think everyone is tired of this and tired of winter.

He crosses his fingers that the government’s roadmap to normality holds water.

If everything goes according to plan, even nightclubs will be allowed to open until the summer.

– But we have reopened before, and had to close again, he recalls.

According to the government’s plan, which will be voted on in parliament, it will not be open for travel internationally until 17 May at the earliest.

There will probably be restrictions on social gatherings and crowds until June 21 at the earliest.

Long until they can live as normal

More than 120,000 people have lost their lives to covid-19 in the UK, which was hit hard by the pandemic early on.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been harshly criticized for not taking the virus seriously early enough. In March last year, Johnson said he, among other things, that continued to shake hands with people. Since then he even got covid-19.

The UK now has some of the fastest vaccination programs in the world. 17 million Britons have received the first dose of the vaccine. In Norway, the number is slightly below 300.000.

Vaccines are one of the reasons why the government dares to start the reopening, Boris Johnson said today.

Boris Johnson with the AstraZeneca vaccine.

VACCINATED: Boris Johnson with the Astra-Zeneca vaccine.

Photo: Paul Ellis / AFP

In April: The pubs open outdoors

If the infection does not increase dramatically, part two of the British reopening has been added to March 29.

  • Up to six people can meet outdoors.
  • Outdoor sports for children and adults are allowed.
  • The order to stay as much as possible at home will be removed, and replaced with a call to stay in the local area.

From 12 April at the earliest:

  • Hair salons and unnecessary shops reopen. Libraries and museums can do the same.
  • Pubs and restaurants can open for al fresco dining.
  • Gyms and swimming pools may reopen, but people can only go there alone or with others in the same household.
  • Funerals can have up to 30 participants. Weddings and receptions can have up to 15 guests.

CLOSED: A man walks past closed shops in London.  Now the stores can probably reopen on April 12.  Unemployment has risen sharply during the pandemic.

CLOSED: A man walks past closed shops in London. Now the stores can probably reopen on April 12. Unemployment has risen sharply during the pandemic.

Photo: Tolga Akmen / AFP

OPEN IN JULY: A waiter at work in a pub in London in July last year.  They had to close again in the autumn.

OPEN IN JULY: A waiter at work in a pub in London in July last year. They had to close again in the autumn.

Photo: Ben Stansall / AFP

The strict rules have hit the weakest in the UK particularly hard. In a survey in which 70,000 Britons were asked, people from ethnic minorities, lower social classes and young people in particular answered that they struggled with a lack of control over their own life situation. They have more often reported mental health problems, anxiety and fear of not having enough money for food and living expenses.

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