The United States, the European Union and the United Kingdom demanded that the Myanmar military not repress the demonstrations

A protester is detained by police officers during a protest against the military coup in Mawlamyine, Myanmar, February 12, 2021.

Western embassies in Burma on Sunday urged the military regime to “not resort to violence” against protesters protesting the coup, following reports of a troop deployment in some areas of the country.

“We call on the security forces not to resort to violence against the protesters, who are protesting against the overthrow of their legitimate government,” according to a statement released on Twitter from the diplomatic representations of the United States, the European Union and Great Britain.

The demand comes after the military junta eliminated fundamental rights to facilitate and increase the number of arrests and records amid the growing protests against the coup on February 1.

The authorities suspended articles 5, 7 and 8 of the Law for the Protection of Security and Privacy of Citizens, which requires an order to be able to detain someone and retain them for more than 24 hours, among other legal guarantees, as reported by the military medium True News Unit.

From now on, Police and military will also not need orders to carry out searches, in addition to having carte blanche to interrupt citizens’ communications and request their data from internet operators.

On the other hand, the military authorities also require citizens to report overnight guests in their homes in order to more easily locate dissidents and supporters of the protests.

Police fire rubber bullets during a protest against the military coup in Mawlamyine, Myanmar, February 12, 2021. Than Lwin Times / Handout via REUTERS / File Photo

Police fire rubber bullets during a protest against the military coup in Mawlamyine, Myanmar, February 12, 2021. Than Lwin Times / Handout via REUTERS / File Photo

The most wanted

The board led by General Min Aung Hlaing published a list of seven of the most prominent activists in the country, which he actively seeks to promote the protests. “If you find any of the fugitives mentioned or if you have any information about them, report to the nearest police station”Said a statement in state media on Sunday. “Those who host them will face measures in accordance with the law.”

Since the beginning of the movement, the military they have already arrested some 400 politicians, activists and members of civil society, including journalists, doctors and students. Among those detained is the Nobel Peace Prize and de facto leader of the country, Aung San Suu Kyi, who has not been heard from since she was placed under house arrest on the day of the coup in the country’s capital, Naipyidó..

The list of seven “fugitives” includes Min Ko Naing, a 1988 student movement figure who spent more than ten years in prison for his role in the anti-dictatorship demonstrations at the time. “They detain people at night and we have to be careful,” he declared hours before his arrest warrant was issued, in a video posted on Facebook on Saturday, violating the Board’s ban on using the social network. “They could repress strongly and we will have to be prepared,” he added.

Protesters hold up posters with the image of Aung San Suu Kyi during a march to protest against the military coup in Myanmar, in central Tokyo, Japan February 14, 2021. REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon

Protesters hold up posters with the image of Aung San Suu Kyi during a march to protest against the military coup in Myanmar, in central Tokyo, Japan February 14, 2021. REUTERS / Kim Kyung-Hoon

In addition to in the streets, the mobilizations against the coup are also carried out on social networks, despite the military junta’s order to block Facebook and Twitter, which many are getting around thanks to VPN programs, which allow access to internet through servers located outside the country.

Social networks are the element that most clearly distinguishes these mobilizations from the protests against the military in 1988 and 2007, which were violently suppressed by the Army.

The military junta, headed by General Min Aung Hlaing, justifies the seizure of power due to an alleged electoral fraud in the elections last November in which the National League for Democracy, the party led by Suu Kyi, devastated, as it already did. in 2015.

Myanmar was governed by different military boards between 1962 and 2011, when they gave way to a transition to a “disciplined democracy” in which the military commanders attributed large quotas of power and almost total autonomy.

With information from APF

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