Vaccine: Quebec aims for a maximum of 90 days between two doses | Coronavirus

The Quebec Immunization Committee (CIQ) wants to save as many lives as possible and the second dose will wait as long as it takes. In Quebec, however, a maximum period of 90 days between the two doses is imposed.

This way of doing things was confirmed Thursday by Richard Massé, strategic medical advisor to the general directorate of public health, Daniel Paré, director of the vaccination campaign in Quebec, and the Minister of Health, Christian Dubé.

The 90-day period corresponds to the time needed to join seniors living in retirement homes (RPA) [leur vaccination débutera le 25 janvier] and those over 70, for “maximum impact”, explained Dr Massé.

It does not mean that we will wait 90 days, but it does mean that we could wait 90 days, depending on the arrival of vaccines he also declared. From next April, more doses will be received, and we can reduce the interval.

This decision will allow us to vaccinate nearly 500,000 vulnerable people. We think this justifies delaying the second dose for a few weeks.

Dr Richard Massé

CIQ experts would like to follow this strategy for the first six priority groups to be vaccinated (1.7 million people) and ideally for the 7th group, the over 60s.

Based on knowledge related to other types of vaccines, the CIQ believes that protection against the disease will be long after the first dose.

For his part, Minister Dubé says he is keeping his goal of receiving 250,000 doses of vaccine by February. So far, 162,000 of these doses have been received in Quebec, he said.

The light is at the end of the tunnel, we are doing as quickly as possible so that you can find a life as normal as possible, he said, addressing the elders.

The experts plan to continuously evaluate data from vaccinated patients to monitor whether there is a decline in vaccine efficacy. In such a case, the second dose could be given more quickly to the first priority groups.

Dr Massé and Paré have also admitted that we do not know, for the moment, the effectiveness of the first dose of the vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna over a period of 90 days.

We know that the protection [offerte par la première dose du vaccin] is good and will continue, however supported Dr. Massé.

Officially, Pfizer-BioNTech recommends vaccinating people with two doses given three weeks apart, while Moderna suggests spacing out doses four weeks apart.

Different recommendation in Ottawa

Quebec reassessed its position for a few days, due to a different opinion from Federal Public Health.

According to Ottawa, the second doses of Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine should preferably be given no more than six weeks after the first. This was the conclusion of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI), chaired by Dr. Caroline Quach.

It is up to each province to determine the vaccination strategy to adopt, in collaboration with its own immunization committee.

<q data-attributes="{"lang":{"value":"fr","label":"Français"},"value":{"html":"Tous les médecins hygiénistes en chef du Canada […] agree: we do our best to respect, to follow the recommendations for the administration of vaccines. But it is an issue because the quantity of vaccines is currently limited in Canada. Also, in some regions of Canada, including Quebec, the pandemic has intensified. There are many more cases, hospitalizations and deaths “,” text “:” All Chief Medical Officers of Health in Canada […] agree: we are doing our best to respect, to follow the recommendations for the administration of vaccines. But it is an issue because the quantity of vaccines is currently limited in Canada. Also, in some regions of Canada, including Quebec, the pandemic has intensified. There are many more cases, hospitalizations and deaths “}}” lang = “fr”>All of Canada’s Chief Medical Officers of Health […] agree: we are doing our best to respect, to follow the recommendations for the administration of vaccines. But it is an issue because the quantity of vaccines is currently limited in Canada. Also, in some regions of Canada, including Quebec, the pandemic has intensified. There are many more cases, hospitalizations and deaths, said Dr Howard Njoo, deputy chief administrator of the Public Health Agency of Canada, during a press briefing on Thursday.

With the available data, it can be recommended that for efficacy, for the interval [entre les] two doses, we have enough data to say, yes, it is effective if we do an interval of up to 42 days. After 42 days, we don’t know, we have no data.

Dr Howard Njoo

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends administration of the second dose within six weeks, while the UK committee recommends a period of 3 to 12 weeks between the two doses.

Health Canada has already questioned the strategy envisaged by Quebec, suggesting that it could jeopardize its efforts to obtain more doses of these vaccines from manufacturers.

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