VW pays compensation to the Austrian police – but not to German car buyers

In the diesel scandal, the carmaker VW has agreed on compensation with the Austrian state. This was confirmed on Saturday by the Austrian Interior Minister Wolfgang Peschorn in Vienna and a VW spokesman in Wolfsburg. The newspaper “Der Standard” had previously reported about it. The dispute concerned the impairment of approximately 2,100 VW diesel vehicles in the fleet of the Austrian police through manipulated exhaust gas software.

“We have agreed not to disclose the precise amount. It is a significant amount and it is reasonable,” said Peschorn on the radio program “Ö1 Mittagsjournal”. According to information from circles, the value of the compensation is well below the 2.6 million euros that Austria had requested.

Agreement is “not a precedent”

A VW spokesman said on request that the Austrian importer Porsche Austria GmbH closed the settlement, not VW in Germany. The spokesman emphasized that the agreement with the Republic of Austria was not a precedent. “The comparison has no effect on other pending cases,” he added.

In September 2015, under pressure from US environmental authorities, VW had admitted to cheating on emissions tests on a large scale. The so-called shutdown devices (“defeat devices”) were used to style the nitrogen oxide measurements down on the test bench. According to the company’s information at the time, the affair affected around eleven million diesel cars worldwide. Because of the “Dieselgate” scandal, the group has already booked more than 30 billion euros in legal costs.

Air duct component against the VW exhaust scandal

In the diesel scandal, the carmaker VW has agreed on compensation with the Austrian state. This was confirmed on Saturday by the Austrian Interior Minister Wolfgang Peschorn in Vienna and a VW spokesman in Wolfsburg. The newspaper “Der Standard” had previously reported about it. The dispute concerned the impairment of approximately 2,100 VW diesel vehicles in the fleet of the Austrian police through manipulated exhaust gas software.

“We have agreed not to disclose the precise amount. It is a significant amount and it is reasonable,” said Peschorn on the radio program “Ö1 Mittagsjournal”. According to information from circles, the value of the compensation is well below the 2.6 million euros that Austria had requested.

A VW spokesman said on request that the Austrian importer Porsche Austria GmbH closed the settlement, not VW in Germany. The spokesman emphasized that the agreement with the Republic of Austria was not a precedent. “The comparison has no effect on other pending cases,” he added.

VW fined billions – and what about German customers?

In September 2015, under pressure from US environmental authorities, VW had admitted to cheating on emissions tests on a large scale. The so-called shutdown devices (“defeat devices”) were used to style the nitrogen oxide measurements down on the test bench. According to the company’s information at the time, the affair affected around eleven million diesel cars worldwide. Because of the “Dieselgate” scandal, the group has already booked more than 30 billion euros in legal costs.

German customers have so far been left empty-handed. The Federation of German Consumer Organizations (VZBV) and the ADAC auto club are jointly filing a declaratory declaratory judgment against VW in order to clarify the claim of cheated car buyers from Germany. However, this sample determination is time-consuming – and with the turn of the year, many claims of the buyer expire on December 31, 2019. On the second day of the trial for the model declaratory action, the Braunschweig Higher Regional Court suggested that both parties make a settlement. The procedure is exclusively for buyers of cars with illegal shutdown devices of the brands VW, Audi, Seat and Škoda with motors of the EA189 type, around 400,000 buyers have registered in the complaint register with the Federal Office of Justice.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.