“Where are kids like mine?”

One day last January, I got up, got dressed, went to the gym, and when I went to bed that night, my 8-year-old son Bennett had been sedated after returning to our local children’s hospital – hourly fits. Bennett has heart-related epilepsy and is sometimes so severely affected that a team of doctors has caused him to medically sedate him to protect his brain neurons from death. It is a picture that I will never forget, but would give anything to get rid of it. And I feel out of control every second of every day.

It’s the same feeling I now see in people around the world when the coronavirus threat (and the resulting COVID-19) spreads: an out of control, anxiety-driven feeling that causes it to People stock everything from hand disinfectants to two-year supplies of toilet paper. Given the insecurity of our own environment, we take all we can to stay in control – which means for many people buying everything they fear they could ever need.

The desperate attempt to protect my family is nothing new to me. When we go out, I hit Bennett in hand sanitizer. I scrub our house, fill it to the brim with vitamins, stay away from crowded places and enforce military rules for washing hands. If you are sick, I do not want to see you near my child for at least two weeks. Neurotic? Naturally. But Bennett’s body doesn’t work like everyone else’s, so these are my options.

The daughter of the author's girlfriend, Julia, 3rd (Photo: Katy Payne)The daughter of the author's girlfriend, Julia, 3rd (Photo: Katy Payne)

The daughter of the author’s girlfriend, Julia, 3rd (Photo: Katy Payne)

But like many people, this is my first pandemic. And after going into three different stores and my husband hurrying home from work early to check a few others, we still couldn’t buy anything that we usually buy to protect our son. The chaos in our stores is a scene from a movie – as if a post-apocalyptic crowd were shopping, bullying, and devouring everything in sight on Black Friday.

I don’t know what to do, like nobody really knows what to do. And I’m upset because media reports mislead us about who is most affected by this outbreak and who endangers children like mine.

<p class = "Artboard-Atom Artboard-Text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Healthline reports that there is only one Risk population, ie people over 65 years of age. The CDC’s first recommendation to protect itself is to stock up on supplies. But The New York Times reports that healthcare professionals are critically short of supplies needed to care for patients, at least in part because consumers buy panic. And now everyone knows that things like hand sanitizers and face masks are about as easy to find as Bigfoot. This is really scary because vulnerable people don’t have the supplies to protect themselves from a number of other common viruses – a terrible thought that struck me as I read The Washington Post Report on how the Italian healthcare system is so overwhelmed that it simply cannot care for everyone. “data-reactid =” 66 “> Healthline reports that there are only such one Risk population, ie people over 65 years of age. The CDC’s first recommendation to protect itself is to stock up on supplies. But The New York Times reports that healthcare professionals are critically short of supplies needed to care for patients, at least in part because consumers buy panic. And now everyone knows that things like hand sanitizers and face masks are about as easy to find as Bigfoot. This is really scary because vulnerable people don’t have the supplies to protect themselves from a number of other common viruses – a terrible thought that struck me as I read The Washington Post Report on how the Italian healthcare system is so overwhelmed that it simply cannot care for everyone.

The author's son. (Photo courtesy of Eden Strong)The author's son. (Photo courtesy of Eden Strong)

The author’s son. (Photo courtesy of Eden Strong)

So where are kids like mine? And everyone else who is immunodeficient or has an underlying state of health? There is more than one way to risk COVID-19. It’s something I learn all too well when I see the foundation that keeps my son alive is breaking down under his feet.

My good friend Katy Payne lives with very similar fears. Her adorable 3-year-old daughter Julia contracted acute flaccid myelitis in 2018, and the condition paralyzed her almost overnight. Even though she has improved since then, she still needs a ventilator that makes breathing easier.

“I’m afraid of coronavirus,” says Katy. “This is something that will infect everyone and most people will not know that they have it at all as they spread it and may kill those with weakened immune systems.” It’s hard to relax, and I worry every time we’re on the go that the little child who hasn’t sneezed in the elbows could be the reason why Julia ends up in the hospital again. Now everyone else has the same fear we have of germs every day and they take all the supplies from people like us who really need them. “

Like the mother I noticed on Facebook, she was begging for Lysol wipes so that she could safely take her child with cancer to chemotherapy.

America is a nation formed in unity, and now we’re fighting for the last roll of toilet paper here in the supermarket. There is a vulnerable secondary population here that people don’t think about when they put a whole shelf in their carts. And while I want to be angry, I know that we’re all just scared.

The only thing I ask as a mother, who was afraid of the coronavirus for a long time, is this: please only take what you need, share what you can, and let’s all try to do this together .

<p class = "Artboard-Atom Artboard-Text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "For the latest news on the developing coronavirus outbreak, see Follow here. Experts say people over 60 and those with weakened immune systems remain the most at risk. If you have any questions, please contact the CDC and WHO Resource manuals. “data-reactid =” 95 “>For the latest news on the developing coronavirus outbreak, see Follow here. Experts say people over 60 and those with weakened immune systems remain the most at risk. If you have any questions, please contact the CDC and WHO Resource manuals.

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