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Pokémon: This YouTuber Loses $ 3.5 Million By Getting Ripped Off

Personality news Pokémon: This YouTuber Loses $ 3.5 Million By Getting Ripped Off

Famous American YouTuber and Influencer Logan Paul spent $ 3.5 million on a bundle of Pokémon cards … and got ripped off!

On December 20, Logan Paul explained that he had spent $ 3.5 million on a bundle of Pokémon cards very first edition. We now know that the YouTuber unfortunately got him …

Poké-dollars don’t buy happiness

His batch of cards had been authenticated by BBCE (Basebal Card Exchange), an agency whose reliability is debated. Reason why videographers and specialized media had looked into the case of this suspect card bundle. Going back to the original ad, the videographers Rattle Pokemon and PokeBeach discover that the seller seems to have no experience in this kind of sales, and has – in addition – no user rating. Even more suspicious, the lot was initially apparently going to be sold for $ 70,000 before the sale is canceled for no obvious reason. The lot went through several hands, its price increasing each time, before landing in those of Bolillo Lajan San who buys it for 2.7 million dollars and then sells it to Logan Paul for 3.5 million.

From Sacha to Joe

Pokémon: This YouTuber Loses $ 3.5 Million By Getting Ripped Off

Due to the suspicious course from this sale, from lack of BBCE experience in this kind of authentication, defects on the cardboard the lot and other details noted by videographers and specialized media, Logan Paul doubts. Reason why he decided to travel to Chicago with Bolillo Lajan San to go see BBCE, responsible for authentication of his lot of cards. This is how the YouTuber discovers that his lot is filled with fake boxes of Pokémon cards … filled – sometimes only half – GI Joe Cards. Suffice to say that it is very far from worth the amount that Logan Paul spent! The YouTuber was therefore ripped off for $ 3.5 million … but won a first place on YouTube Trends.

This necessarily reminds us of the 7.6 tons of fake Pokémon cards seized in November by the Chinese authorities. See the video at the beginning of the article.

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Find out more about the Pokémon universe

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