Australian University of Monash: A discovery of a parasite drug kills the Corona virus in 48 hours

A study conducted by the Australian University of Monash, showed that there may be finally hope to eliminate the Corona virus, after discovering an anti-parasite drug already available around the world, that can kill the virus within 48 hours.

The scientists from the Institute of Biomedicine in Monash, that a single dose of “Ivermectin”, can stop the growth of the Corona virus in cells.

Ivermectin is an FDA-approved anti-parasite drug, and has also been shown to be effective in the laboratory against a wide variety of viruses, including HIV, dengue fever, influenza and the Zika virus.


Corona kills 48 hours

According to the university’s official website, Dr. Kylie Wagstaff of the Monash Institute of Biomedicine, who led the study, said that scientists showed that the drug, Ivermectin stopped the growth of the Corona virus in cells within 48 hours.

She added: “We found that even a single dose of infection could essentially remove all viral RNA for 48 hours and even in 24 hours there was a significant decrease in that.” But the doctor warned, that the tests conducted in the study were in the laboratory And that more people should be tested.

Although ivermectin is widely used as a safe drug, we need to know if the dose that you can use in humans will be effective.

According to the study, it does not know the mechanism by which Ivermectin works on the virus, but it is possible, based on its effect on other viruses, that it works to stop the virus by “suppressing” the ability of the host cells to get rid of it.

Dr. Wagstaff made a previous surprising discovery about ivermectin in 2012 when she identified the drug and its antiviral activity with Professor Monash Biomedical Institute discovery David Ganz, also the author of this paper. Professor Janz and his team have been searching for Ivermectin for more than 10 years using different viruses.

Dr. Wagstaff said that the use of ivermectin to combat COVID-19 will depend on the results of further preclinical tests and ultimately clinical trials, with the urgently needed funding to continue the work progress.

The results of a collaborative study led by the Monash Biomedical Institute (BDI) with the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunology (Doherty Institute), have been published in the medical journal Antiviral Research.

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