EMA expert confirms “link between AstraZeneca vaccine and rare cases of thrombosis”



Laser beams make visible a thrombosis generated in a Max Planck pharmacological laboratory of the University of Schiller, Jena, Germany


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Laser beams make visible a thrombosis generated in a Max Planck pharmacological laboratory of the University of Schiller, Jena, Germany

“Now we can say it, it is clear that there is a link with the vaccine, which causes that reaction. However, we still do not know why (…) In summary, in the next few hours we are going to say that there is a link, but we have yet to understand why it happens, “said Marco Cavaleri, head of vaccine strategy at EMA.

The European authority must officially pronounce on this issue, Cavaleri said. “We are trying to have a precise framework of what is happening, to define the syndrome due to the vaccine (…) Among vaccinated people there has been a higher number of cases of cerebral thrombosis among young people than we expected. we’re going to have to say it, “he explained.

Suspicions about possible serious but rare side effects have been raised among people vaccinated with AstraZeneca for several weeks. It would be cases of atypical thrombosis, some of them have caused death.

“Unexpected” cases of cerebral thrombosis among young people

“We are trying to have a precise framework of what is happening, to define the syndrome due to the vaccine (…) Among vaccinated people there has been a higher number of cases of cerebral thrombosis among young people than we expected. we’re going to have to say it, “he explained.

Suspicions about possible serious but rare side effects have been raised among people vaccinated with AstraZeneca for several weeks. It would be cases of atypical thrombosis, some of them have caused death.

In the United Kingdom there are 30 cases and seven deaths out of a total of 18.1 million doses administered until March 24. For EMA “a causal link with the vaccine has not been demonstrated,” as the executive director, Emer Cooke, explained several days ago. For the European agency, according to current scientific knowledge, “there is no evidence to support restricting the use of this vaccine in any population.”

For Paul Hunter, a specialist in medical microbiology at the University of East Anglia, interviewed by AFP, “the evidence points more towards the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine as the cause,” he said.

As a precaution, several countries have decided to stop administering this vaccine to some age groups, including France, Germany and Canada. For AstraZeneca, the benefits of the antidote from the Anglo-Swedish laboratory in the prevention of covid-19 outweigh the risks of side effects and assured on Saturday that “patient safety” is its “top priority.”

EMA will issue official conclusion on Thursday or Friday

Experts from the European Medicines Agency are meeting from April 6 until next Friday to conclude their evaluation of rare cases of blood clotting and their possible relationship with AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine, whose use is paralyzed in some European countries for children under 60 years of age pending these conclusions.

The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC), in charge of monitoring and evaluating the safety of medicines for human use authorized by the EMA, examines the results until next Friday, so it is expected to report its updated assessment on AstraZeneca safety on one of those days.

jov (efe, afp, ilmessaggero, dpa, ema)

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